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West Melton Record Interview

Castle Hill Village author releases first book

by Belinda Cullen-Reid

 

Greg Hopkinson enjoys the relaxed lifestyle
at Castle Hill Village

Author Greg Hopkinson from Castle Hill Village has released his first book — a memoir about his life as a young businessman searching for a more peaceful existence.

Boundless: A wayward entrepreneur’s search for peace is Mr Hopkinson’s account of his life to date and includes tales of his adventures across the globe, including being trapped in an avalanche, working in the Soviet Union, and establishing a chain of retail stores back in New Zealand.

Mr Hopkinson told The Record that none of his high paced activities bought him the peace he desired.

“I was doing business in the Soviet Union as it collapsed and thinking making a lot of money and retiring early would deliver peace of mind. No it didn’t. 

Establishing a chain of retail stores in New Zealand meant I moved even further away from my desire for peace. Then I did the most unlikely thing — I became a monk,” Mr Hopkinson said.

In contrast to his previous life Mr Hopkinson now lives with his partner Sally in the Canterbury high country where he spends around two to three hours each day in meditation.

“Most days I get out for a walk in the local environ, and during winter I ski for two or three hours about three days a week.”

“Living in the high country is actually very social. It seems like most days we either have someone staying with us, or someone popping in. We also travel often to teach meditation courses,” he said.

His book is full of helpful tips on how to find contentment. 

“Thirty practical, down-to-earth clues are subtly woven into the book — if practised, each clue reveals more peace and contentment for anyone.”

“The hope is that at least one clue will resonate with every reader, and that the reader will become aware that they can easily make different choices that will reveal more peace, contentment, happiness and love in their life,” he said. Mr Hopkinson said despite his relaxed lifestyle he still has a lot of projects going on, including the Boundless project, which expands on the book and includes a website, Facebook page and Youtube channel, teaching principals of happiness. 

“Three friends and I are embarking on an eight-month road trip through New Zealand, the United Kingdom and on to Europe where we are delivering clues to happiness, and randomly interviewing and filming people from all walks of life and asking them what reveals contentment and happiness in their lives. It’s called the boundless.info project,” he said. Mr Hopkinson is writing a second book that carries on with the themes found in Boundless.